A couple things about the food…

If you recall, last year I wrote a post about the reasons certain folks hate Thanksgiving.  I had a lot of fun writing it.  So I did it again.  You can read it below.  But Mom thought I was bit too rantastic, and by that she meant I was mean, in my own disdain for the Left’s feelings about Thanksgiving.  So I tried to find some common ground with the Haters.

After some brief, albeit shallow, research I discovered that one of the ajor complaints about Thanksgiving among Thanksgiving Haters is the food.  And, truth be told, I kinda have some sympathy for them here.

For example, yams.  What the hell is a yam?  Yam sounds like something Patriots fans yell when Tom Brady hits Gronk for a first down on 3rd and 15.  “Yam baby!  Brady is yamming the Jets today!”  But it doesn’t sound like food.  Turns out yams should be the Left’s favorite Thanksgiving food.  70% of the world’s yams are produced in Nigeria.  They were imported from Africa to the Caribbean during the Slave trade.  Yams have a bit of identity crisis and they are often mistaken for sweet potatoes and often treated and prepared as if they, in fact, are sweet potatoes.  In vegetable circles, this is known as Sweet Potato Privilege.  Yam interest groups, in their fight for vegetable equality, are pushing Big Vegetable to change production practices in order end institutional yamism.  While efforts in the Vegetable Congress have focused on raising taxes on sweet potatoes and using the new revenue to provide free yams to consumers regardless of yam demand.

Cranberry sauce.  This is not a sauce.  It is also not edible.  It’s a canned tube of gelatin.  Cranberry sauce is jello’s a-hole cousin that nobody likes but still shows up at Thanksgiving to regale everyone with it’s tales of awesomeness while pointing out to everybody what they’re doing wrong.  When not being served at Thanksgiving, it doubles as the gel used to test ballistics on spent rounds of ammunition in crime labs across the country.

Butter.  I totally understand and generally endorse the use of butter to turn crescent rolls into carby, oily wonderfulness.  But, and let me be clear about this, the butter on the mashed potatoes in the huge bowl should not be pooling into small ponds deep enough that if, by accident of course, a crescent roll slid off your plate into the aforementioned butter pond, it would be completely submersed and require the use of commercial tongs to retrieve.  If you go to the mashed taters and Hudson Bay is present, just walk by.  You can’t eat that.

Greenbean casserole.  Stop trying to trick me by combining green beans with fried onions, cream of mushroom soup and cheddar cheese.  They’re still green beans.  And along with broccoli and cauliflower, represent a triumvirate of things I hope to avoid on Thanksgiving.  Other things I hope to avoid on Thanksgiving: any discussion of broadway musicals, watching the Cowboys win, and defending my natural tendency to believe beer is always appropriate as a beverage.

Giblets.  Dude, they are sealed in a bag and placed into the body cavity of the bird.  That all sounds ominous.  Like the turkey zombie virus is carried by the giblets so they have to be sealed in a bag to prevent an outbreak.

Marshmallows.  I mean…what!?  When in the hell did it become okay to 1) put marshmallows on anything other than a smore, and 2) serve them on Thanksgiving?  Stop doing it.  What’s next?  Are you going to serve shrimp ceviche, ahi tuna and oyster casserole?

So there you have it, the Thanksgiving haters have one gripe that I’m willing to entertain.  Briefly.  Otherwise, shut up and enjoy the rest of your pumpkin ales and Octoberfest beers, the pie and the, well, the pie.  Also just a couple more weeks until Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

The Thanksgiving Debate

I really can’t let it go.  The Thanksgiving Haters fascinate me.  The day is about gratitude, family and/or friends and traditions.  Yet many folks simply can’t let the rest of us enjoy it.  They can’t keep the hate to themselves.  They have to make a statement regarding their enlightened views on the holiday.  If you hate Thanksgiving, why do I have to be part of the hate?  Go ahead and hate it.  I know it’s cool amongst smug know it all progressive leftists to hate Thanksgiving.  I understand that the haters believe Thanksgiving is a holiday created by a morally bankrupt America that celebrates murder, genocide and oppression.  And I think its funny that you all get together in faux abhorrence this time of year with your lattes and wax on about the plight of the indigenous peoples of the New World while lamenting your own wretched Caucasian genes and carrying all that white guilt.

 

Now you may be thinking that I’m just a sarcastic intellectually dishonest jerk?  And I’m not going to lie, I do enjoy sarcasm and have often employed it inappropriately.  But while you’re shaking your head in sanctimonious patronizing self-assuredness, read what University of Texas journalism professor Robert Jensen wrote in his article “How I Stopped Hating Thanksgiving and Learned to Be Afraid” in CommonDreams.org just before Thanksgiving back in 2009.

 

“Although it’s well known to anyone who wants to know, let me summarize the argument against Thanksgiving: European invaders exterminated nearly the entire indigenous population to create the United States. Without that holocaust, the United States as we know it would not exist. The United States celebrates a Thanksgiving Day holiday dominated not by atonement for that horrendous crime against humanity but by a falsified account of the “encounter” between Europeans and American Indians.  When confronted with this, most people in the United States (outside of indigenous communities) ignore the history or attack those who make the argument. This is intellectually dishonest, politically irresponsible, and morally bankrupt.”

 

So, anyway, again for those who care to know, here’s a quick summary of the “falsified” history of Thanksgiving we were all taught.  The first Thanksgiving was in 1621.  The Pilgrims hopped aboard the Mayflower, crossed the Atlantic, and smacked into Plymouth Rock.  Then, those who survived that first winter in Massachusetts celebrated their good fortune with the new neighbors, the Wampanoag.  And like most neighbors they didn’t always get along.  But on this day they evidently did.  However, like many family gatherings, it led to emergency room visits over the next several years.  Most of the Left’s abhorrence regarding the holiday emanates here.  You can choose to debate them.  Or you can shake your head in mock appreciation and just make fun of them.  It’s easier, takes less time and it makes them mad.

 

So here’s a rapid-fire Chronicles of Dad rundown of Turkey Days since the pilgrims.  According to History.com, for the 150 or so years after that first Thanksgiving, New England settlers celebrated days of thanksgiving on an occasional and sometimes annual basis.  The menu was diverse.  And by this I mean they killed things and ate them.  Then in 1789 George Washington “issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country’s war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies.”  Interestingly, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson did not.

 

New York was the first state to officially name Thanksgiving a holiday in 1817 even though New Hampshire and Massachusetts both held days of Thanksgiving in 1816. In 1827, Sarah Josepha Hale, the first woman magazine editor in America, began a 36 year campaign to have Thanksgiving named a national holiday.  In 1863, President Lincoln finally agreed.  With the Civil War at its peak Lincoln wrote that all Americans should ask God to “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife” and to “heal the wounds of the nation.”  Abe named the final Thursday in November as the day and right up until 1939 that’s the way it was.  That’s when FDR tried to move Thanksgiving from Lincoln’s designated day up a week to give the country an economic boost through an additional week of Christmas shopping.  It would seem liberals need to control the economy extends to changing national holidays.  Then in 1941 Congress and FDR permanently established the fourth Thursday in November as a national holiday.

 

In 1924 Macy’s began its traditional Thanksgiving Day Parade.  And despite its inherent corporate greed, liberals and progressives have been to known to attend and even watch it on TV.  Rumor has it though that the ensuing self-loathing results in skyrocketing profits for the makers of Prozac and Zoloft… furthering the self-loathing and profits.

 

About ten years later, the Lions started playing, and losing, on Thanksgiving. Then in the 60’s the Cowboys got in on it because they assumed everybody wanted to watch them.  The TV networks got involved and made it awesome.  Then in 1988 “Every Rose Has It’s Thorn” soared up the charts which of course led to the hair metal power ballad becoming intertwined with Thanksgiving.

 

Which of course leads back the central questions of how exactly were George Washington, Sarah Hale, Abe Lincoln, the Detroit Lions and Poison engaged in the “genocidal campaign against indigenous people that is central to the creation of the United States”?

 

Or we can all just enjoy the day…